Civil War recruitment poster, Boston 1862.

F.A. Searle, steam printer, Journal Building, 118 Washington Street, Boston.

The shade of Washington. The above natural curiosity was lately discovered in the woods bordering on the great river Mississippi. Lithograph, Edward Williams Clay. New York, 1839.

Hoosac Tunnel Route hand book of summer resorts. Lithograph, The Bufford Company, Boston. 1875.

More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection. More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection.

More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection.

More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection. More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection.

More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection.

More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection. More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection.

More ream wrappers from the Society’s collection.

Decorative ream wrappers like those illustrated here often show the tidy exteriors of paper mills or long views of paper-manufacturing towns. They were used by paper makers to both protect the ream from dirt and moisture and as a form of advertising. Often printed on colored paper and stamped or printed with the ream size and paper weight, these sheets were ephemeral and were not intended to be saved once the ream was opened. AAS holds a collection of sixty ream wrappers, mostly from mills around New England, but there are also representative sheets from mills in New York and Pennsylvania. Decorative ream wrappers like those illustrated here often show the tidy exteriors of paper mills or long views of paper-manufacturing towns. They were used by paper makers to both protect the ream from dirt and moisture and as a form of advertising. Often printed on colored paper and stamped or printed with the ream size and paper weight, these sheets were ephemeral and were not intended to be saved once the ream was opened. AAS holds a collection of sixty ream wrappers, mostly from mills around New England, but there are also representative sheets from mills in New York and Pennsylvania.

Decorative ream wrappers like those illustrated here often show the tidy exteriors of paper mills or long views of paper-manufacturing towns. They were used by paper makers to both protect the ream from dirt and moisture and as a form of advertising. Often printed on colored paper and stamped or printed with the ream size and paper weight, these sheets were ephemeral and were not intended to be saved once the ream was opened. AAS holds a collection of sixty ream wrappers, mostly from mills around New England, but there are also representative sheets from mills in New York and Pennsylvania.

"Heavy Weather"

Lithograph, tinted. J.H. Bufford, Boston ca. 1856-1866.

Lithograph, 1865 : Advertising print for an insurance company, using images of the life and death of Lincoln. Arranged around a large central portrait of Lincoln, two roundels at top depict his home and tomb, while three vignettes at bottom, under the heading “Early life,” show him “Splitting rails,” the “Log cabin built by Mr. Lincoln in Macon Co. Ills. in 1830,” and the young Lincoln “Rafting” down a river.

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address.

Lithograph : Map of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania with Union and Confederate positions shown, Union in blue, and Confederate in red. The Confederate corps are named, as are the Union corps, in more detail.

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address.